Tag Archives: awards

It’s All About the Brow: Anthony Davis Sweeps the SEC Awards

Freshmen Anthony Davis and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist both made the all-SEC first team.

FIRST TEAM

F Anthony Davis, Kentucky: 14.4 ppg, 9.8 rpg, 4.7 bpg

Anthony Davis was outstanding this season. The native Chicagoan is going to rack up a lot of awards and honors in the next few months: first team All-America, National Player of the Year, National Unibrow of the Year, No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, etc.. More on Davis later.

F Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Kentucky: 11.9 ppg, 7.8 rpg, 2.1 apg

Kidd-Gilchrist might be the second best freshman in the country, but he also happens to be the second best freshman on No.1 Kentucky. As outstanding as Anthony Davis has been, Kidd-Gilchrist has been great in his own right. The future top-five pick is an all-around stud with one hell of a motor. Kidd-Gilchrist’s offensive rating of 111.o ranked eighth among SEC players who used at least 20 percent of their team’s possessions. The 6-7 forward also ranked among the SEC’s top 25 in effective field goal percentage (49.8), true shooting percentage (56.0), offensive rebounding percentage (10.3), defensive rebounding percentage (17.3) and block percentage (3.3).

G John Jenkins, Vanderbilt: 20.0 ppg, 2.7 rpg, 1.1 apg

The sharp-shooting junior was one of the most efficient offensive players in the country. Jenkins’ offensive rating of 127.3 ranked first in the SEC and fifth in the country among players who used at least 20 percent of their team’s possessions. The 6-4 guard was one of the best shooters in the SEC and the entire country. Jenkins led the SEC in points per game (20.2) while ranking second (behind Anthony Davis) in effective field goal percentage (63.8) and true shooting percentage (67.0). He also ranked eighth in the nation in effective field goal percentage and 12th in true shooting percentage. Jenkins shot a blistering .461 percent from behind the arc (third in the SEC), and led the conference in three-pointers made (118). He also was second in the SEC in free throw percentage (.849).

G Jeffery Taylor, Vanderbilt: 17.1 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 1.8 apg

Taylor teamed up with teammate John Jenkins to form one of the sharpest-shooting duos in the country. Taylor, the SEC’s second leading scoring (17.1), ranked sixth in effective field goal percentage (59.2) and ninth in true shooting percentage (60.2). Taylor shot .451 percent from three, the fourth highest mark in the SEC. His offensive rating of 114.5 was best among the 14 SEC players who used at least 24 percent of their team’s possessions.

G Kenny Boynton, Florida: 16.8 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 2.5 apg

Boynton was the most-efficient guard in the Gators’ crowded, talented backcourt. The 6-2 junior ranked second in the SEC and 29th in the nation in offensive rating (125.2) among players who used at least 20 percent of their team’s possessions. Boynton is an accomplished scorer. He was the fourth leading scorer in the SEC (16. 8 ppg) and ranked fifth in both effective field goal percentage (59.9) and true shooting percentage (62.2). He also ranked fourth in three-point percentage (.434) and second in three-pointers made (102).

Gators Brad Beal and Erving Walker both made the all-SEC second team.

SECOND TEAM

F Terrence Jones, Kentucky: 12.3 ppg, 6.6 rpg, 1.9 bpg

F Arnett Moultrie, Mississippi State: 16.1 ppg, 10.7 rpg, 1.1 apg

G Bradley Beal, Florida: 14.4 ppg, 6.5 rpg, 2.0 apg

G Erving Walker, Florida: 12.4 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 4.7 apg

G B.J. Young, Arkansas: 15.3 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 2.3 apg

Trae Golden is one of two Volunteers on the all-SEC third team.

THIRD TEAM

F Patric Young, Florida: 10.5 ppg, 6.5 rpg, 1.2 apg

F Jeronne Maymon, Tennessee: 12.6 ppg, 7.8 rpg, 1.2 apg

G Dee Bost, Mississippi State: 15.8 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 5.3 apg

G Trae Golden, Tennessee: 13.4 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 4.5 apg

G Doron Lamb, Kentucky: 13.3 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 1.7 apg

AWARDS

Never shave it, Anthony.

Player of the Year, Freshman of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year: Anthony Davis, Kentucky

Um, Anthony Davis is pretty good at basketball. Let’s start on offense. Davis’ offensive rating of 138.1 was No. 1 in the SEC and No. 2 in the nation. He was first in the SEC and fourth in the nation in effective field goal percentage (66.7), and first in the SEC and fifth in the nation in true shooting percentage (68.4). The 6-10 freshman also ranked ninth in the conference in offensive rebounding percentage (11.7), first in turnover rate (9.3) and sixth in free throw rate (55.4). On defense, no player impacted the game like the unibrowed Chicagoan. He was the best shot blocker in the country, ranking first in blocks per game (4.7) and third in block percentage (14.7). He also averaged 1.4 steals per game and ranked 14th in the SEC in steal percentage (2.7). Say what you want about the one-and-done rule, but it’s been a ton of fun watching Davis play at the college level this season.

I’ll use any excuse I can to get more Derrick Rose on this blog.

Coach of the Year: John Calipari, Kentucky

Yes, John Calipari is coaching the most talented team in the country, but if your team goes a perfect 16-0 in conference play, you’re going to win coach of the year in that conference every time. Calipari has led the young and immensely talented Wildcats to 30 wins and a No. 1 ranking.

As always, all stats come from Ken Pomeroy’s amazing website.

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Yes, the Pac-12 did play this season: Handing Out Awards in the Pac-12

Aussie Brock Motum was one of the Pac-12’s best players this season.

First off, let me admit that I watched a small amount of Pac-12 basketball this season. There are a couple reasons for this. One, not many Pac-12 games are on TV in the Midwest. And two, I haven’t been very motivated to seek out Pac-12 basketball, it’s been pretty mediocre this season. So, for good or bad, my picks are based mostly on tempo-free stats.

Having not watched Pac-12 basketball this season, I was surprised to see that Cal’s Jorge Gutierrez was named the conference’s Player of the Year. I put Gutierrez on my second team. I know those type of awards usually go to a player on the best or second-best team in the conference, but I thought Cal teammate Allen Crabbe, and maybe even Justin Cobbs, was better statistically than Gutierrez. On to the awards:

FIRST TEAM

F Brock Motum, Washington State: 18.1 ppg, 6.5 rpg, 1.7 apg

The junior forward was highly featured in the Cougars offense. He ranked eighth in the Pac-12 in minutes played (80.6), fourth in possession percentage (28.8) and second in shot percentage (29.0). Of the four Pac-12 players who used at least 28 percent of their team’s possessions, Motum had the highest offensive rating (108.2). The native Australian was an efficient shooter, ranking fifth in effective field goal percentage (58.6) and third in true shooting percentage (61.8).

F Andre Roberson, Colorado: 11.1 ppg, 11.2 rpg, 1.9 bpg

Roberson was one of the best rebounders in the nation this season. His 11.2 rebounds per game ranked first in the Pac-12 and fourth in the nation. The sophomore grabbed 30.4 percent of available boards on defense, the best mark in the Pac-12 and second best in the entire country. His offensive rebounding percentage of 13.4 was good for third in the Pac-12. Roberson also ranked first in the conference in blocks per game (1.9) and fourth in block percentage (7.1).

G Terrence Ross, Washington: 15.3 ppg, 6.6 rpg, 1.3 spg

The talented Ross was the best player on the Pac-12’s best team. More on him later.

G Jared Cunningham, Oregon State: 18.2 ppg, 3.7 rpg, 2.6 apg

Cunningham was the Pac-12’s leading scorer in 2012, edging out Motum by .1 points. The junior guard also led the Pac-12 in steals per game (2.6) and steal percentage (4.2). His steal percentage was the 27th best in the nation. Cunningham was effective getting to the free throw line, ranking third in the Pac-12 in free throw rate (64.9) and fouls drawn per 40 minutes (6.6). He shot .755 percent from the charity stripe.

G Devoe Joseph, Oregon: 16.8 ppg, 3.7 apg, 2.9 apg

The former Golden Gopher had a solid senior season for the bubblicious Oregon Ducks. The 6-4 guard was highly efficient, ranking third in offensive rating (118.1) among Pac-12 players who used at least 20 percent of their team’s possessions. Joseph was third in the Pac-12 in points per game (16.8), sixth in effective field goal percentage (58.1) and fourth in true shooting percentage (61.4). His turnover rate of 15.4 ranked third among Pac-12 point guards.

Jorge Gutierrez is one of two Cal guards on the second team.

SECOND TEAM

F Solomon Hill, Arizona: 12.5 ppg, 7.8 rpg, 2.7 apg

F E.J. Singler, Oregon: 13.2 ppg, 5.5 rpg, 2.2 apg

G Jorge Gutierrez, Cal: 12.9 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 4.0 apg

G Allen Crabbe, Cal: 15.4 ppg, 5.6 rpg, 2.1 apg

G Kyle Fogg, Arizona: 13.5 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 2.3 apg

Sophomore Devon Collier was highly efficient for the Beavers.

THIRD TEAM

F Devon Collier, Oregon State: 12.8 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 1.3 bpg

F Josh Owens, Stanford: 12.1 ppg, 5.8 rpg, 1.0 spg

G Justin Cobbs, Cal: 12.8 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 5.1 apg

G Tony Wroten, Washington: 16.3 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 3.7 apg

G C.J. Wilcox, Washington: 13.9 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 1.1 apg

AWARDS

Sophomore Terrence Ross won an uninspiring race for Pac-12 Player of the Year.

Player of the Year: Terrence Ross, Washington

Honestly, I had no idea who to pick for this award.  There were more than a few Pac-12 players who had very solid seasons, but nobody had an all-around, eye-popping campaign. In a situation like this, I feel the safest pick is the best player on the best team. So, I went with Washington’s Terrence Ross.  The sophomore didn’t even lead the Huskies in points, rebounds or assists, but I felt he was their best and most talented player. Ross ranked sixth in the Pac-12 in points per game (15.3) and fifth in rebounds (6.6). He also ranked among the Pac-12’s top 25 players in offensive rating (108.8), effective field goal percentage (52.6), defensive rebounding percentage (17.8), turnover rate (16.5), block percentage (3.0) and steal percentage (2.3). Ross didn’t do a whole lot to separate himself from the pack, except for being on the regular season champion. Solid cases could be made for Brock Motum, Jared Cunningham, Jorge Gutierrez, Allen Crabbe or Devoe Joseph.

Tony Wroten was solid this year, but definitely has room for improvement.

Freshman of the Year: Tony Wroten, Washington

I might have been a little harsh on Wroten by putting him on the third team. On the surface, his per games averages of 16.3 points, 4.9 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 2.0 steals look great, especially considering he’s a freshman. Wroten had a huge impact on the court – he used 33 percent of the Huskies’ possessions, the eighth highest mark in the country. A closer examination of Wroten’s numbers shows some holes in his resume. Wroten was inefficient and prone to turnovers.  He ranked 60th in offensive rating (95.0) and 56th in turnover rate (22.0) out of the 75 Pac-12 players who played at least 40 percent of their team’s minutes. Wroten ranked 39th in effective field goal percentage (46.1) and true shooting percentage (49.3) out of the 45 Pac-12 players who played at least 60 percent of their team’s minutes. The freshman shot a dismal .184 percent from behind the three-point line (49 attempts). Wroten was effective in getting to the free throw line – he was second in the Pac-12 in fouls drawn per 40 minutes (7.0) – but he shot just .575 from the charity strip.

Andre Roberson was the second best defensive rebounder in the nation.

Defensive Player of the Year: Andre Roberson, Colorado

The sophomore big man led the Pac-12 in rebounds and blocked shots per game. He grabbed 30.4 percent of available boards on defense, the best mark in the Pac-12 and second best in the entire country. Roberson ranked fourth in the Pac-12 in block percentage (7.1).

Tad Boyle’s Buffaloes finished fifth in the Pac-12 this year.

Coach of the Year: Tad Boyle, Colorado

Colorado was picked 10th in the preseason Pac-12 media poll after losing Alec Burks and Cory Higgins to the NBA.  However, Boyle was able to lead the Buffaloes to a 11-7 conference record and a fifth place finish. Colorado is 19-11 and probably headed for the NIT.

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Respect Your Elders: Seniors Rule Our End of Season Big East Awards

West Virginia’s Kevin Jones is one of four seniors on the all-Big East first team.

FIRST TEAM

F Jae Crowder, Marquette: 17.6 ppg, 7.9 rpg, 2.1 apg

Crowder was an all-around stud for the Golden Eagles this season. The senior averaged 17.6 points a game while ranking second in the Big East in both effective field goal percentage (58.7) and true shooting percentage (61.7). His offensive rating of 123.5 ranks second in the Big East and 42nd in the nation among players who used at least 20 percent of their teams’ possessions. The 6-6 forward stepped out for 155 three-pointers this year, connecting on a decent .361 percent of the long-range shots. On the defensive end, Crowder grabbed 20.5 percent of available boards, the seventh best mark in the Big East. He also ranked 19th in block percentage (3.2) and fifth in steal percentage (4.2).

F Kevin Jones, West Virginia: 20.0 ppg, 11.2 rpg, 1.3 apg

Because the Mountaineers have had their worst year in the Bob Huggins’ era, Jones’ outstanding season has gone a bit under the radar. But Jones has put on an All-America type season, leading the Big East in both points and rebounds per game. More on Jones later.

F Kris Joseph, Syracuse: 14.1 ppg, 5.0 rpg, 1.7 apg

This was a tough call between Joseph and Notre Dame’s Jack Cooley. But in the end, it didn’t seem right to have zero Syracuse players on the first team. Syracuse went 17-1 in Big East play – the best mark in conference history – and Joseph was the Orange’s top player. Joseph, Syracuse’s leading scorer, had the fifth best offensive rating (115.0) among Big East players who used at least 20 percent of their teams’ possessions. The native Canadian also ranked among the Big East’s top 25 in turnover rate (11.7), steal percentage (2.7) and true shooting percentage (55.0).

G Jeremy Lamb, UConn: 17.6 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 1.7 apg

The defending champion Huskies have had a disappointing season, but you can’t really put the blame on sophomore stud Jeremy Lamb. The lengthy guard has put together a terrific season despite playing on what seems to be a dysfunctional team. Lamb has the fourth highest offensive rating (115.5) among Big East players who used at least 20 percent of their teams’ possessions. He ranks eighth in the conference in effective field goal percentage (55.2) and fourth in true shooting percentage (58.9). Lamb has made .605 percent of his two-point field goal attempts, but just .328 percent of his three-point attempts. However, the guard has taken 186 three-pointers this season, the sixth most in the Big East. Lamb and the Huskies could both benefit from a reduction in his three-point attempts.

G Darius Johnson-Odom, Marquette: 18.3 ppg, 3.4 rpg, 2.8 apg

Johnson-Odom is one of four seniors to make the all-Big East first team. At a time when college basketball seems to be dominated by one-and-done superstars (i.e., Kentucky), that’s a welcome sight. Johnson-Odom ranked second in offensive rating (110.2) among Big East players who used at least 24 percent of their teams’ possessions. The former junior college star led the Golden Eagles in scoring, while ranking 16th in the conference in effective field goal percentage (53.6) and tenth in true shooting percentage (57.5). He was also the seventh best three-point shooter (.401) in the Big East.

SECOND TEAM

F Jack Cooley, Notre Dame: 12.5 ppg, 9.2 rpg, 1.6 bpg

F Hollis Thompson, Georgetown: 13.0 ppg, 5.6 rpg, 1.5 apg

G Sean Kilpatrick, Cincinnati: 14.6 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 2.0 apg

G Maalik Wayns, Villanova: 17.5 ppg, 3.7 rpg, 4.6 apg

G Jason Clark, Georgetown: 14.3 ppg, 4.3 rpg, 1.8 apg

THIRD TEAM

F Gorgui Dieng, Louisville: 9.5 ppg, 9.1 rpg, 3.2 bpg

F Herb Pope, Seton Hall: 15.3 ppg, 10.3 rpg, 1.6 bpg

G Scoop Jardine, Syracuse: 8.6 ppg, 2.3 rpg, 4.9 apg

G Dion Waiters, Syracuse: 11.9 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 2.6 apg

G Jordan Theodore, Seton Hall: 16.0 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 6.7 apg

AWARDS

Player of the Year: Kevin Jones, West Virginia

I can’t punish Kevin Jones for not being on one of top teams in the Big East, his performance this season was too outstanding. Jones had a first-team All-America type season, leading the Big East in both points and rebounds per game. The young Mountaineers have relied heavily on Jones all season. The senior has been on the floor for 93 percent of West Virginia’s total minutes played, the tenth highest mark in the country. His offensive rating of 124.6 is No. 1 in the Big East and 35th in the nation among players who used at least 20 percent of their teams’ possessions. The senior forward has been a beast on the glass – on offense and defense. He ranked fourth in the Big East in defensive rebounding percentage (22.0) and seventh in offensive rebounding percentage (12.9).

Freshman of the Year: LaDontae Henton, Providence

Henton averaged 14 points and eight rebounds a game for Providence. The 6-6 forward rarely saw the bench this season – he was on the floor for 92.4 percent of the Friars’ minutes played. The freshman ranked 25th in the Big East in effective field goal percentage (52.0), 23rd in true shooting percentage (54.8) and 18th in defensive rebounding percentage (16.8).

Defensive Player of the Year: Fab Melo, Syracuse

After a disappointing freshman year, a slimmed-down Melo was one of the most dominant shot-blockers in the country this year. The Brazilian tallied 87 blocks, averaging 3.1 per game. Melo ranked first in the Big East and fourth in the nation in block percentage (14.02).

Coach of the Year: Mike Brey, Notre Dame

Most people had low expectations for the Fighting Irish going into this season. Then the Irish lost their best player, Tim Abromaitis, for the season due to injury, and expectations went even lower. By mid-January, Notre Dame was 11-8 and 3-3 in the Big East, and the Irish looked to be on the bubble for the NIT. But then, Brey’s Irish defeated No. 1 Syracuse, sparking a 10-2 finish to the regular season. Notre Dame is now the No. 3 seed in the Big East tournament and a lock to make the NCAA Tournament. For that, Brey is easily the Big East’s coach of the year.

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T-Rob Takes It All: Handing Out End of the Year Awards in the Big 12

Thomas Robinson was the Big 12’s best player this season.

FIRST TEAM

F Thomas Robinson, Kansas: 17.8 ppg, 11.8 rpg, 1.1 bpg

T-Rob is a definite first team All-American and one of the two main contenders (along with Kentucky’s Anthony Davis) for national Player of the Year. More on Robinson later.

F Ricardo Ratliffe, Missouri: 13.9 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 1.0 bpg

Ratliffe has been one of the best offensive players in the country this year. He has the 12th best offensive rating (127.9) in the country, and is the national leader in effective field goal percentage (70.8) and true shot percentage (71.1). As Luke Winn of Sports Illustrated noted this week, Ratliffe has done the vast majority of his offensive damage right at the rim. Through 17 Big 12 games, the senior forward hadn’t even attempted a shot outside the paint. Ratliffe has been one of the best offensive rebounders in the nation as well, ranking first in the Big 12 and 23rd in the country in offensive rebounding percentage (15.1). His defensive work has also been above average. He ranks fifth in the Big 12 in defensive rebounding percentage (19.7) and 11th in block percentage (3.9).

G J’Covan Brown, Texas: 19.6 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 3.9 apg

Brown is a scorer first – he leads the Big 12 in scoring at 19.6 points per game –  but the junior guard has also done a good job distributing the ball to his teammates without turning the ball over much. His assist rate of 25.5 ranks 10th in the Big 12 and his turnover rate of 15.6 ranks 15th. Brown is a vital part of the Longhorn offense. He uses 27.8 percent of their possessions and takes 31.6 percent of the shots when he’s on the court. His offensive rating of 114.1 ranks second among Big 12 players who have used at least 28 percent of their teams’ possessions.

G Tyshawn Taylor, Kansas: 17.1 ppg, 1.8 rpg, 4.9 apg

Taylor’s career at Kansas has been an interesting journey full of twists and turns. But the senior guard turned in his best and most consistent season this year. Taylor’s role increased and he responded to the greater responsibility by improving his effective field goal percentage (51.9 to 55.9), increasing his assist rate (27.4 to 30.3) and lowering his turnover rate (26.7 to 22.1). Taylor has taken more than twice as many three-pointers this season (50 in 2011, 123 in 2012) and his three-point percentage has improved from .380 to .431.

G Marcus Denmon, Missouri: 18.0 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 2.2 apg

Denmon led Mizzou in scoring and was the best guard in the Tigers’ four-man backcourt this season. The senior was one of the Big 12’s elite offensive players in 2012, ranking second in offensive rating (128.0), fifth in effective field goal percentage (58.5),  fourth in true shooting percentage (62.8) and second in turnover rate (9.1). The 6-3 Denmon was also the best defensive rebounding guard in the Big 12, collecting 13.8 percent of available boards on defense. He also ranked tenth in steal rate (2.7).

Royce White led the Cyclones in points, rebounds and assists this season.

SECOND TEAM

C Jeff Withey, Kansas: 9.2 ppg, 6.3 rpg, 3.2 bpg

F Royce White, Iowa State: 13.0 ppg, 9.1 rpg, 5.2 apg

F Perry Jones, Baylor: 13.2 ppg, 7.3 rpg, 1.3 apg

G Rodney McGruder, Kansas State: 15.2 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 1.3 apg

G Michael Dixon, Missouri: 13.3 ppg, 1.9 rpg, 3.2 apg

Steven Pledger might have been the best under-the-radar player in the conference.

THIRD TEAM

F Quincy Acy, Baylor: 12.3 ppg, 7.3 rpg, 2.0 bpg

G Keiton Page, Oklahoma State: 16.6 ppg, 1.8 rpg, 2.1 apg

G Pierre Jackson, Baylor: 12.7 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 5.7 apg

G Phil Pressey, Missouri: 9.9 ppg, 3.4 rpg, 6.1 apg

G Steven Pledger, Oklahoma: 16.9 ppg, 4.0 rpg, 1.5 apg

AWARDS

Player of the Year: Thomas Robinson, Kansas

Robinson showed flashes of greatness last year coming off the bench in relief of the Marcus and Markieff Morris. With the Morris twins in the NBA, Robinson has been the main man for the Jayhawks this season – and he’s been outstanding. Robinson led the Jayhawks in scoring and was the best rebounder in the Big 12. He might have been the best rebounder anywhere, as his defensive rebounding percentage (32.0) was No. 1 in the nation. The junior forward ranked second in offensive rating (108.1) among Big 12 players who used at least 28 percent of their teams’ possessions. He also ranked 14th in both effective field goal percentage (53.7) and true shooting percentage (57.2). While he’s not the elite shot-blocker teammate Jeff Withey is, Robinson still protects the rim well, ranking 11th in the Big 12 in block percentage (3.8).

Quincy Miller edged out Oklahoma State’s Le’Bryan Nash for Big 12 freshman of the year.

Freshman of the Year: Quincy Miller, Baylor

The Bears’ prized recruit has been a efficient offensive weapon this season. Miller ranks third in offensive rating (109.4) among Big 12 players who have used at least 24 percent of their teams’ possessions. That’s a higher mark than Thomas Robinson, Tyshawn Taylor or Royce White.

Jeff Withey don’t give a shit.

Defensive Player of the Year: Jeff Withey, Kansas

The junior blocked exactly 100 shots for the Jayhawks this season. Withey’s block percentage of 14.8 ranked first in the Big 12 and second in the nation. He also ranked seventh in the conference in defensive rebounding percentage (19.1).

Robinson and Self both took home some individual hardware this season.

Coach of the Year: Bill Self, Kansas

This was the year someone other than Kansas was supposed to win the Big 12 for the first time since 2004. Kansas lost four starters plus talented reserve Jose Selby from their 2011 Elite Eight team – but there wasn’t a drop-off. The Jayhawks went 16-2 in conference play this year and took home their eighth straight regular season Big 12 crown. Self deserves a ton of credit, this might have been his greatest coaching job to date.

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Do-It-All Draymond: Handing Out End of the Year Awards in the Big Ten

Draymond Green led the Spartans to a Big Ten regular season title.

FIRST TEAM

F Draymond Green, Michigan State: 16.1 ppg, 10.2 rpg, 3.6 apg

Day-Day has done it all this season for the Spartans, and done it all well. Green is a shoo-in for first team All-America and is probably third in the race for national Player of the Year – behind Kentucky’s Anthony Davis and Kansas’ Thomas Robinson. More on Green later.

F Jared Sullinger, Ohio State: 17.0 ppg, 9.3 rpg, 1.1 apg

Ohio State hasn’t had the dominant season many expected, but Sullinger has still had an outstanding season. The slimmed-down sophomore is hard to stop on offense. He is tied with John Shurna for the highest offensive rating (117.5) among Big Ten players who have used at least 24 percent of their teams’ possessions. He also ranks 13th in effective field goal percentage (56.7) and 11th in true shooting percentage (61.1). Sullinger has been one of the conference’s elite rebounders, ranking second in the Big Ten in both offensive (12.0) and defensive rebounding percentage (25.6). His defensive mark is good for 25th in the nation.

F John Shurna, Northwestern: 20.1 ppg, 5.3 rpg, 2.7 apg

As mentioned above, Shurna is tied with Sullinger for the highest offensive rating (117.5) in the conference. His shot may be ugly, but Shurna makes things happen on offense. The senior leads the Big Ten with 20.1 points per game, and ranks 15th in effective field goal percentage (56.3) and 14th in true shooting percentage (59.4). The 6-9 forward has excellent range, making .425 percent of his three-point attempts. Shurna has also been one of the Big Ten’s better shot-blockers, ranking seventh in block percentage (5.3).

F Robbie Hummel, Purdue: 16.8 ppg, 7.0 rpg, 2.0 apg

It’s been odd watching Hummel play this season without his old running mates JaJuan Johnson and E’Twaun Moore (both are currently on the Boston Celtics). But despite playing without those stars and having to recover from two season-ending ACL injuries, Hummel has had a strong finish to his Purdue career. The 6-8 forward has the third best offensive rating (116.0) among Big Ten players who have used at least 24 percent of their teams’ possessions. The fifth-year senior leads the Boilermakers with 16.8 points per game, but Hummel has also been valuable on the defensive end. Hummel ranks fifth in the Big Ten in defensive rebounding percentage (20.8) and 10th in block percentage (4.7).

G Jordan Taylor, Wisconsin: 14.6 ppg, 3.6 rpg, 4.1 apg

Taylor came into the season as a preseason All-American, but he just squeaked onto the Big Ten’s postseason first team. It was a tough call between Taylor and Michigan freshman Trey Burke, and really, there isn’t a wrong choice. I gave Taylor the edge due to his aversion to turnovers, and the fact that the Badgers would be NIT bound, or worse, without him. Among Big Ten point guards, Taylor ranks fifth in assist rate (27.2) and first in turnover rate (12.0).

Michigan’s Trey Burke is one of two freshman on the second team.

SECOND TEAM

F Cody Zeller, Indiana: 15.5 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 1.2 apg

F Deshaun Thomas, Ohio State: 15 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 0.9 apg

G Aaron Craft, Ohio State: 8.6 ppg, 2.9 rpg, 4.5 apg

G Trey Burke, Michigan: 14.5 ppg, 3.4 rpg, 4.8 apg

G Tim Frazier, Penn State: 18.8 ppg, 4.8 rpg, 6.3 apg

John Shurna gets all the attention in Evanston, but Drew Crawford has been great for the Wildcats.

THIRD TEAM

F Tim Hardaway Jr., Michigan: 14.5 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 2.3 apg

C Meyers Leonard, Illinois: 13.6 ppg, 8.1 rpg, 1.9 bpg

G Drew Crawford, Northwestern: 16.1 ppg, 4.5 rpg, 2.1 apg

G Lewis Jackson, Purdue: 10.3 ppg, 3.1 rpg, 4.2 apg

G Matt Gatens, Iowa: 15.7 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 1.8 apg

Honorable Mention: William Buford, Ohio State; D.J. Byrd, Purdue; Keith Appling, Michigan State; Brandon Paul, Illinois; Branden Dawson, Michigan State

AWARDS

Player of the Year: Draymond Green, Michigan State

As one would expect from the nation’s best conference, there have been a lot of great individual performances in the Big Ten this season. However, picking Draymond Green as the conference’s player of the year was a no-brainer. Green has done everything for the Spartans this season, as evidenced by the number of categories in which he ranks among the top 20 in the Big Ten. The senior forward ranks seventh in offensive rating (108.3), 18th in offensive rebounding percentage (8.3), first in defensive rebounding percentage (27.1), 13th in assist rate (22.8), 16th in block percentage (3.2) and 10th in steal percentage (2.8).

Cody Zeller will lead the Hoosiers to their first NCAA Tournament appearance since 2008.

Freshman of the Year: Cody Zeller, Indiana

Trey Burke would be the best freshman in a lot of conferences across America, but Cody Zeller happens to also play in the Big Ten. Zeller has had a tremendous season for the Hoosiers, and it was hard leaving him off the first team. His offensive rating of 127.9 is first in the Big Ten and 12th in the nation among players who used at least 20 percent of his team’s possessions. Zeller has been an efficient scoring machine for Indiana. The freshman is the third in the Big Ten and 19th in the nation in effective field goal percentage (63.4), and first in the Big Ten and 10th in the nation in true shooting percentage (10th). He has also been a solid rebounder, ranking fifth among Big Ten players in offensive rebounding percentage (10.7) and 15th in defensive rebounding percentage (16.7). Zeller was also the Big Ten’s ninth best shot-blocker, posting a block percentage of 4.8.

Big Ten guards have nightmares about Aaron Craft.

Defensive Player of the Year: Aaron Craft, Ohio State

Craft might be the best on-ball defender in college basketball. The sophomore averages 2.41 steals per game and ranks first in the Big Ten and 16th in the nation in steal percentage (4.61). Craft’s defensive prowess is more than steals, he has the ability to take an opposing team’s best guard out of the game.

Izzo did it again and the Spartans are a final four contender.

Coach of the Year: Tom Izzo, Michigan State

Michigan State was unranked in pre-season polls, and after the Spartans started the season 0-2, expectations were low in East Lansing. But, Izzo did his thing – again – and the Spartans are now regular season Big Ten champs, ranked in the top-five and in line for a one-seed in the NCAA Tournament.

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In Appreciation of Mike Scott: Handing Out End of the Year Awards in the ACC

Tyler Zeller is one of three Tar Heels that made our All-ACC First Team.

I know we’re starting a little early, but over the next week, we’ll be announcing our season-ending college hoops awards. First up, the ACC:

FIRST TEAM

F Mike Scott, Virginia: 16. 9 PPG, 8.1 PPG, 1.2 APG

Scott’s offensive rating of 117.2 ranks first in the ACC and fourth in the nation among players who used at least 28 percent of their team’s possessions. More on Scott later.

F Harrison Barnes, North Carolina: 17.7 PPG, 5.1 RPG, 1.1 APG

Barnes might not have put together an All-American type season, but he still played well enough to make the ACC’s first team. The native Iowan ranks second in the conference in points per game (17.7), and his offensive rating of 112.2 is third among ACC players who used at least 24 percent of their team’s possessions.

F Tyler Zeller, North Carolina: 16.2 PPG, 9.3 RPG, 1.5 BPG

Zeller has probably been the Tar Heels’ best player this season. His offensive rating of 120.7 ranks first in the ACC and eighth in the country among players who used at least 24 percent of their team’s possessions. He ranks 10th in the conference in defensive rebounding percentage (19.1) and 11th in offensive rebounding percentage (14.6).

G Kendall Marshall, North Carolina: 6.8 PPG, 2.5 RPG, 9.6 APG

Marshall’s twitter handle is @kbutter5, and his passes on the court are just as smooth. His assist rate of 43.4 ranks first in the ACC and sixth in the nation.

G Austin Rivers, Duke: 15.3 PPG, 3.3 RPG, 2.1 APG

It was a really though call between Rivers and Miami’s Durand Scott. I went with Rivers because his play has gotten better and better as the year’s gone on, and I believe he’s the biggest reason the Blue Devils are ranked No. 3 in the country. When the game’s on the line, Rivers is a stone cold killer.

Miami’s Durand Scott has been a stat-stuffer this season.

SECOND TEAM

F John Henson, North Carolina: 14.0 PPG, 10.3 RPG, 3.1 BPG

F Mason Plumlee, Duke: 10.8 PPG, 9.4 RPG, 1.5 BPG

G Andre Young, Clemson: 13.3 PPG, 2.8 RPG, 3.3 APG

G Terrell Stoglin, Maryland: 21.0 PPG, 3.4 RPG, 1.9 APG

G Durand Scott, Miami: 13.1 PPG, 5.3 RPG, 3.2 APG

C.J. Harris had a solid season for a poor Demon Deacons team.

THIRD TEAM

F Kenny Kadji, Miami: 13.0 PPG, 5.8 RPG, 1.8 BPG

F Ryan Kelly, Duke: 12.2 PPG, 5.5 RPG, 1.1 APG

G Seth Curry, Duke: 13.6 PPG, 3.1 RPG, 2.5 APG

G Michael Snaer, Florida State: 13.9 PPG, 3.9 RPG, 1.9 APG

G C.J. Harris, Wake Forest: 16.8 PPG, 3.1 RPG, 2.5 APG

Mike Scott might not be known across the country, but the Virginia forward was a beast this season.

PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Mike Scott, Virginia

Mike Scott might be the most under-appreciated player in the country. The junior forward is an efficient scorer, posting an effective field goal percentage of 58.3 (2nd in ACC) and a true shooting percentage of 62.9 (1st in the ACC). Scott was also one of the most dominant rebounders in the conference, grabbing 23.9 percent of the available boards on the defensive end (3rd in the ACC) and 10.1 percent on offense (13th in the ACC). Scott’s offensive rating of 117.2 ranks first in the ACC and fourth in the nation among players who used at least 28 percent of their team’s possessions.

Doc’s kid is a stone cold assassin when the game’s on the line.

FRESHMAN OF THE YEAR: Austin Rivers, Duke

After taking some time to get used to the college game, Rivers has come on strong at the end of the year. His game-winner against North Carolina ranks as one of the most memorable moments of the regular season. The freshman’s improved play is one of the biggest reasons why the Blue Devils have moved up to No. 3 in the polls and are in line to receive a one-seed in the NCAA Tournament.

Henson has been a great defensive rebounder and shot-blocker this season.

DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE YEAR: John Henson, North Carolina

Henson ranks second in the ACC in defensive rebound percentage (24.7) and first in block percentage (10.1).

Coach K and Duke will play for the ACC regular season title on Saturday.

COACH OF THE YEAR: Mike Kryzewski, Duke

The Blue Devils lost the No. 1 overall draft pick (Kyrie Irving) and two four-year contributors who led Duke to the 2010 National Title (Nolan Smith and Kyle Singler), yet Duke is ranked No. 3 in the nation and is in line to receive a one-seed in the NCAA Tournament. Coach K has done a great job turning this year’s Blue Devils into a final four contender.

As always, all advanced stats came from Ken Pomeroy’s amazing website.

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Fun With MLB Awards and Playoff Predictions

AL MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

Ellsbury had a tremendous season all around. He got on base at a .376 clip, hit over 30 homers, stole almost 40 bases and played great defense in center. I gave Ellsbury the slight nod over Jose Bautista (MLB’s best hitter in 2011) because of Ellsbury’s superior defense at a premium position. Ellsbury’s speed, he stole 39 bases, also helped put him over the top.

1. Jacoby Ellsbury, BOS

.321 AVG, .376 OBP, .552 SLG, 32 HR, 39, SB, 9.6 WAR

2. Jose Bautista, TOR

.302 AVG, .447 OBP, .608 SLG, 1.056 OPS, 43 HR, 8.4 WAR

3. Justin Verlander, DET

24-5, 2.40 ERA, 0.92 WHIP, 9.0 K/9, 170 ERA+, 8.6 WAR

4. Miguel Cabrera, DET

.344 AVG, .448 OBP, .586 SLG, 30 HR, 105 RBI, 7.3 WAR

5. Curtis Granderson, NYY

.262 AVG, .364 OBP, .552 SLG, 41 HR, 119 RBI, 25 SB, 6.9 WAR

6. Dustin Pedroia, BOS

.307 AVG, .387 OBP, .474 SLG, 21 HR, 26 SB, 8.0 WAR

7. Ian Kinsler, TEX

.255 AVG, .355 OBP, .477 SLG, 32 HR, 30 SB, 7.8 WAR

8. Adrian Gonzalez, BOS

.338 AVG, .410 OBP, .548 SLG, 27 HR, 117 RBI, 6.4 WAR

9. Robinson Cano, NYY

.302 AVG, .349 OBP, .533 SLG, 28 HR, 118 RBI, 5.6 WAR

10. CC Sabathia, NYY

19-8, 3.00 ERA, 1.23 WHIP, 8.7 K/9, 147 ERA+, 6.9 WAR

AL CY YOUNG

Verlander has been flat out dominant this season, and gets my vote for Cy Young. However, the resumes of Verlander and Sabathia are closer than it is made out to be, as Verlander is seen as the far and away favorite.

1. Justin Verlander, DET

24-5, 2.40 ERA, 0.92 WHIP, 9.0 K/9, 170 ERA+, 8.6 WAR

2. CC Sabathia, NYY

19-8, 3.00 ERA, 1.23 WHIP, 8.7 K/9, 147 ERA+, 6.9 WAR

3. Jered Weaver, LAA

18-8, 2.41 ERA, 1.01 WHIP, 7.6 K/9, 158 ERA+, 6.6 WAR

4. C.J. Wilson, TEX

16-7, 2.94 ERA, 1.19 WHIP, 8.3 K/9, 152 ERA+, 5.0 WAR

5. Dan Haren, LAA

16-10, 3.17 ERA, 1.02 WHIP, 5.81 K/BB, 120 ERA+, 4.0 WAR

AL ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

Hellickson is clearly the AL’s rookie of the year for his solid performance this entire season. However, is he even the most talented rookie pitcher on the Rays? Phenom Matt Moore, who only made one start for the Rays this season, will be the Game 1 starter for Tampa tomorrow.

1. Jeremy Hellickson, TB

13-10, 2.95 ERA, 1.15 WHIP, 5.6 K/9, 126 ERA+, 4.2 WAR

2. Eric Hosmer, KC

.293 AVG, .334 OBP, .465 SLG, 19 HR, 78 RBI, 1.6 WAR

3. Dustin Ackley, SEA

.273 AVG, .348 OBP, .417 SLG, .340 wOBA, 2.7 WAR

4. Mark Trumbo, LAA

.254 AVG, .291 OBP, .477 SLG, 29 HR, 87 RBI, 2.3 WAR

5. Ivan Nova, NYY

16-4, 3.70 ERA, 1.33 WHIP, 5.3 K/9, 119 ERA+, 3.6 ERA

This is a really close call. Kemp and Braun both had great seasons, and no matter who wins the winner will be deserving. However, I went with Kemp because his offensive are slightly better than Braun’s, and he plays a more premium position than Braun, and plays it a bit better.

NL MOST VALUABLE PLAYER

1. Matt Kemp, LAD

.324 AVG, .399 OBP, .586 SLG, 39 HR, 126 RBI, 40 SB, 8.7 WAR

2. Ryan Braun, MIL

.332 AVG, .397 OBP, .531 SLG, 33 HR, 111 RBI, 33 SB, 7.8 WAR

3. Justin Upton, ARZ

.289 AVG, .369 OBP, .529 SLG, 31 HR, 88 RBI, 21 SB, 6.5 WAR

4. Joey Votto, CIN

.309 AVG, .416 OBP, .531 SLG, 29 HR, 103 RBI, 6.8 WAR

5. Prince Fielder, MIL

.299 AVG, .415 OBP, .566 SLG, 38 HR, 120 RBI, 5.6 WAR

6. Troy Tulowitzki, COL

.302 AVG, .372 OBP, .544 SLG, 30 HR, 105 RBI, 6.2 WAR

7. Shane Victorino, PHI

.279 AVG, .355 OBP, .491 SLG, 17 HR, 61 RBI, 5.8 WAR

8. Albert Pujols, STL

.299 AVG, .415 OBP, .566 SLG, 37 HR, 99 RBI, 5.2 WAR

9. Lance Berkman, STL

.301 AVG, .412 OBP, .547 SLG, 31 HR, 94 RBI, 5.0 WAR

10. Jose Reyes, NYM

.337 AVG, .384 OBP, .493 SLG, 39 SB, .386 wOBA, 6.3 WAR

Again, another close call. I’m going with Kershaw because his numbers are just a bit better than Halladay, who had another tremendous season. Lee also had a Cy-worthy season for the Phils. Man, is that rotation going to be a beast in the playoffs.

NL CY YOUNG

1. Clayton Kershaw, LAD

21-5, 2.28 ERA, 0.98 WHIP, 9.6 K/9, 163 ERA+, 6.9 WAR

2. Roy Halladay, PHI

19-6, 2.35 ERA, 1.04 WHIP, 8.5 K/9, 164 ERA+, 7.4 WAR

3. Cliff Lee, PHI

17-8, 2.40 ERA, 1.03 WHIP, 5.67 K/BB, 161 ERA+, 6.9 WAR

4. Ian Kennedy, ARZ

21-4, 2.88 ERA, 1.09 WHIP, 8.0 K/9, 137 ERA+, 5.5 WAR

5. Matt Cain, SF

12-11, 2.88 ERA, 1.08 WHIP, 7.3 K/9, 123 ERA+, 3.9 WAR

NL ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

Kimbrel stumbled down the stretch, perhaps due to overuse by manager Fredi Gonzalez. It’s no wonder Gonzalez wanted Kimbrel on the mound as much as possible because Kimbrel was flat out un-hittable before September.

1. Craig Kimbrel, ATL

46 Saves, 2.10 ERA, 1.04 WHIP, 14.8 K/9, 181 ERA+, 3.0 WAR

2. Vance Worley, PHI

11-3, 3.01 ERA, 1.23 WHIP, 8.1 K/9, 129 ERA+, 2.8 WAR

3. Freddie Freeman, ATL

.282 AVG, .346 OBP, .448 SLG, 21 HR, 76 RBI, 1.1 WAR

4. Danny Espinosa, WSH

.236 AVG, .323 OBP, .414 SLG, 21 HR, 17 SB, 3.5 WAR

5. Wilson Ramos, WSH

.267 AVG, .334 OBP, .445 SLG, 15 HR, .332 wOBA, 3.1 WAR

PLAYOFF PREDICTIONS

DIVISION SERIES

Brewers over D-Backs in 4

Phillies over Cardinals in 3

Yankees over Tigers in 4

Rangers over Rays in 4

CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES

Brewers over Phillies in 7

Rangers over Yankees in 6

WORLD SERIES

Brewers over Rangers in 6

MVP: Corey Hart

My predictions are usually wrong, and this is one case where I really, really hope I’m wrong. Anybody but the Brewers, please…

Everything is going Wisconsin’s way (sports wise, definitely not with politics)

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